When will I be able to fly beyond visual line of sight? When will I be able to operate a drone over people?

In the world of drone law (and in the world of drones in general), hardly a week, or even a day, passes without one or both of those questions being asked.

The drone industry welcomed the long-awaited drone regulations of Part 107, which became effective in August of 2016. However, that only whetted our appetite for more.

The current presidential administration’s public pronouncements regarding scaling back government regulations creates a concern within the commercial drone industry. Contrary to most industries, in the commercial drone industry more regulations are necessary for the drone industry to advance. Targeted regulations that permit and define the parameters of beyond visual line of sight operations, flights over people, and nighttime operations will enable the drone industry to reach its potential.

62815354 - drone regulations banner in wood type

Recently the Small UAV Coalition sent a letter to the new Director of the Office of Management and Budget requesting a limited waiver from the moratorium on new regulations. The Small UAV Coalition has a diverse membership that have all have a keen interest in the commercial use of drones, inclduing AirMap, Amazon Prime Air, Google[x], Intel, Kespry, PrecisionHawk, Verizon Ventures, Aerware, AGI, Flirtey, Fresh Air Educators, T-Mobile, and WalMart.

In that letter, the Small UAV Coalition noted that there are currently three pending rulemaking actions regarding drone operations:

  • Notice of Proposed Rulemaking, Operation of Small Unmanned aircraft Over People
  • Final Rule, Operation of Small Unmanned Aircraft Over People
  • Notice of Proposed Rulemaking, Expanded Operations

Part 107 includes a provision for the FAA to grant waivers that would permit drone operations over people and beyond visual line of sight. However, since Part 107 became effective in August of 2016, the FAA has only granted one waiver to permit operations over people and only four waivers to operate beyond visual line of sight.

As is the case with most technology, regulations pace far behind what is needed for the technology to evolve and thrive. The technology exists, but without regulations permitting its use, it cannot be utilized.

As the Small UAV Coalition noted in its letter, without regulations that permit beyond visual line of sight, operations over people, and nighttime operations, the commercial UAS industry in the United States risks stalling and falling behind other countries, such as those in the European Union, China, and Australia.