Patience is bitter, but its fruit is sweet.” – Aristotle

Yeah, well, you know, that’s just, like, your opinion, man.” – The Dude

It has been a long time coming.

Indeed, it was over 4 years ago that Congress approved the FAA Modernization and Reform Act of 2012 (FMRA) requiring the FAA to integrate drones into the National Airspace System. To that end, the FMRA directed the FAA to issue rules to regulate commercial drones and have the rules finalized by September 30, 2015.

In accordance with this congressional mandate, in February 2015, the FAA published a Small UAS Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (NPRM)—or Part 107. But the September 30, 2015, deadline came and went without any word from the FAA.

Finally, on June 21, 2016, the FAA released its Part 107 rules regulating the commercial operation of drones weighing less than 55 pounds. These rules do not apply to hobby or recreational drones.

The Part 107 rules go into effect today, August 29, 2016.

 new regulations

Before the issuance of these new rules, a person seeking to fly a drone for commercial purposes was required to petition the FAA for authorization.

In particular, there were 3 ways to lawfully conduct drone operations: (1) as public aircraft operations pursuant to the requirements of the public aircraft statute and under a Certificate of Waiver or Authorization (COA) from the FAA; (2) as limited commercial operations by type certificated drone, provided the operator obtains a COA from the FAA; or (3) pursuant to Section 333 of the FAA Modernization and Reform Act (FMRA) grant of exemption provided the operator obtains a COA from the FAA.

In the upcoming months, the FAA plans to continue to enhance flexibility for those operating drones commercially by issuing more rules and regulations. In fact, by this December it is likely that the FAA will propose a rule for safely and securely flying over persons not associated with a drone operation. See 14 C.F.R. § 107.39. Also, a few months after that, many expect that the FAA will propose rules enhancing flexibility for those operating drones commercially under Part 107—such as operating drones at night. See 14 C.F.R. § 107.29.

But until the FAA issues additional rules and regulations, remote pilots must traverse the usual legal channels—if not allowed under Part 107 or the Part 107 certificate of waiver. This includes registering their aircraft under 14 C.F.R. Part 47, or pursuing a certificate of waiver or authorization, a certificate of aircraft worthiness, or a Section 333 Exemption. Hopefully these upcoming regulations will further streamline the legal and administrative processes as drone technology continues to evolve.