19666995 - rubber stamps marked with regulations and rules

In 2012, Congress approved the FAA Modernization and Reform Act (FMRA) requiring the FAA to integrate drones into the National Airspace System (NAS). To that end, the FMRA specifically directed the FAA to issue proposed rules to fully regulate commercial drones and have the rules finalized by September 30, 2015. Hence, the FAA published a Small UAS Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (NPRM)—or Part 107—in early 2015. In a previous article, we discussed these proposed rules. The September 30, 2015, deadline came and went without any word from the FAA regarding final rules…until now.

Yesterday the FAA released its final Part 107 regulations, allowing the operation of commercial drones in the NAS. A comprehensive analysis of these regulations is forthcoming, but in the meantime, here are some notable highlights of Part 107:

Operational Limitations:

  • Drones are restricted from flying higher than 400 feet above ground level, unless the drone: (1) is flown within a 400-foot radius of a structure, and (2) does not fly higher than 400 feet above the structure’s immediate uppermost limit.
  • These rules will go into effect on August 29, 2016, and do not apply to hobby or recreational drones.

48063974 - flying through the town of drones tokyo japan image

Remote Pilot Requirements:

  • Prior to the final Part 107 regulations, in order to operate a commercial drone with a Section 333 Exemption, the drone operator was required to have an airline transport, commercial, private, recreational, or sport pilot license (also known as Part 61 certificate holders). Under Part 107 regulations, Part 61 certificate holders (other than student pilots) may still operate a commercial drone as long as they pass an online training course and have completed a flight review in the last 24 months. The Rules also provide an alternative mechanism for commercial drone operators, referred to as a “remote pilot” in Part 107. To obtain a remote pilot certificate, the applicant—minimum age is 16 years old—must “pass an initial aeronautical test” and complete an application through the FAA. Both those who qualify under Part 61 as well as those who pass the initial aeronautical test under Part 107 must be vetted by the Transportation Security Administration.
  • Remote Pilots cannot fly solely pursuant to Part 107 rules under certain circumstances: beyond visual line of sight operations, night operations, drones weighing 55 pounds or more, operating higher than 400 feet (except near structures as noted above), reaching speeds faster than 100 MPH, and operating over persons. A remote pilot would need a standard Certificate of Waiver or Authorization, a special Section 333 Exemption, or a combination of a Special Airworthiness Certificate and Certificate of Authorization.
  • Section 333 Exemption holders may still operate a drone pursuant to the terms of their authorized exemption despite the new regulations.

You can read the full text and summary sheet of the regulations here.

The regulations provide commercial drone operators some clarity about the commercial use of their drones. Moreover, the regulations also remove the requirement of obtaining a Section 333 exemption for commercial drone operations as long as the operation complies with Part 107. Stay tuned for updates.

Lynnel Reyes, a summer associate in the firm’s Las Vegas office, also contributed to this post.